Sunday, 15 January 2017

BBC report on Blind Veterans Gallery in St Georges Hall, Liverpool

Blind veterans' art goes on show in Liverpool



Signed portraits of actress Dame Barbara Windsor and tennis champion Sir Andy Murray have gone on show in a display by blind veterans.
The exhibition, at St George's Hall in Liverpool, also includes a painting of former footballer Steven Gerrard, which will be put up for auction.
Funds will go to the charity Blind Veterans UK, which set up the display, titled Art - Life beyond Sight Loss.
Ex-soldier Matt Rhodes said painting gave him "a new lease of life".
Ex-soldier Matt Rhodes has painted an updated version of the John Singer Sargent painting Gassed
His modern version of the John Singer Sargent painting "Gassed" showing a line of wounded soldiers following a mustard gas attack in World War One is also on display at the Liverpool exhibition.
The 42-year-old, from Preston, lost most of his sight after a motorcycle accident, which left him with a brain injury and paralysis down the right side of his body. 
"I have half tunnel vision so when I'm working I can only see small sections of the painting like an eyebrow or an ear. I have to work my way around doing each bit on its own. It does mean that I can never see the whole finished work."
He added: "Unfortunately, my injuries have become worse over the last few months and I have had to stop painting conventionally." 
He said he was "working with the instructors on finding new techniques using new technologies".
Blind Veterans UK, which was formed in 1915, said it believed art and craft skills was an "important element of rehabilitation" for former members of the military.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-38622443

Tuesday, 10 January 2017

Ben Shephard

Benjamin Peter Sherrington "Ben" Shephard (born 11 December 1974)[1][2] is an English television presenter and journalist who is currently employed by ITV. His most recognised role was as a main presenter on the now defunct breakfast programme GMTV. He has hosted game shows such as The Krypton Factor (2009–2010), Tipping Point (2012–present) and Ninja Warrior UK (2015–present).
Since April 2014, Shephard has co-hosted the ITV breakfast show Good Morning Britain, alongside Susanna Reid and Kate Garraway.

Sunday, 27 November 2016

My daughters Bethany Rhodes drawing

This wonderful drawing was done by my daughter, Bethany Rhodes, when she was only 13. The drawing was for my gallery in St Georges Hall, Liverpool, from the 13th of January 2017 for Blond Veterans UK.

Thursday, 1 September 2016

Clint Eastwood "Dirty Harry"

Cop Harry Callahan (Clint Eastwood) attempts to track down a psychopathic rooftop killer before a kidnapped girl dies. When he is found Harry abuses the murderer's civil rights putting him back on the streets. Once he is released he hijacks a school bus and Harry must go after him again. The only way to stop this vicious killer is in cold blood.

Wednesday, 31 August 2016

Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn (/ˈɔːdri ˈhɛpˌbɜːrn/; born Audrey Kathleen Ruston; 4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was a British actress. Recognised as a film and fashion icon, Hepburn was active during Hollywood's Golden Age. She was ranked by the American Film Institute as the third-greatest female screen legendin Golden Age Hollywood and was inducted into the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame. Born in Ixelles, a district of Brussels, Hepburn spent her childhood between Belgium, England and the Netherlands. In Amsterdam, she studied ballet with Sonia Gaskell before moving to London in 1948, continuing her ballet training with Marie Rambert, and then performing as a chorus girl in West Endmusical theatre productions.
Following minor appearances in several films, Hepburn starred in the 1951 Broadway play Gigi after being spotted by French novelist Colette, on whose work the play was based. She shot to stardom for playing the lead role in Roman Holiday (1953), for which she was the first actress to win an Academy Award, a Golden Globe and a BAFTAAward for a single performance. The same year Hepburn won a Tony Awardfor Best Lead Actress in a Play for her performance in Ondine. She went on to star in a number of successful films, such as Sabrina (1954), The Nun's Story(1959), Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), Charade (1963), My Fair Lady (1964) and Wait Until Dark (1967), for which she received Academy Award, Golden Globe and BAFTA nominations. Hepburn won a record three BAFTA Awards for Best British Actress in a Leading Role. In recognition of her film career, she was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from BAFTA, the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award and the Special Tony Award. She remains one of the few people who have won Academy, Emmy, Grammy and Tony Awards.
Hepburn appeared in fewer films as her life went on, devoting much of her later life to UNICEF. She had contributed to the organisation since 1954, then worked in some of the poorest communities of Africa, South America and Asia between 1988 and 1992. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of her work as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador in December 1992. A month later, Hepburn died of appendiceal cancer at her home in Switzerland at the age of 63.

Sir Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-ChurchillKGOMCHTDPCDLFRSRA (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British statesman who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a non-academic historian, a writer (as Winston S. Churchill), and an artist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature, and was the first person to be made an honorary citizen of the United States.
Churchill was born into the family of the Dukes of Marlborough, a branch of the Spencer family. His father, Lord Randolph Churchill, was a charismatic politician who served as Chancellor of the Exchequer; his mother, Jennie Jerome, was an American socialite. As a young army officer, he saw action in British India, the Anglo–Sudan War, and the Second Boer War. He gained fame as a war correspondent and wrote books about his campaigns.
At the forefront of politics for fifty years, he held many political and cabinet positions. Before the First World War, he served as President of the Board of TradeHome Secretary, and First Lord of the Admiralty as part of Asquith'sLiberal government. During the war, he continued as First Lord of the Admiralty until the disastrous Gallipoli Campaigncaused his departure from government. He then briefly resumed active army service on the Western Front as commander of the 6th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers. He returned to government under Lloyd George as Minister of MunitionsSecretary of State for WarSecretary of State for Air, then Secretary of State for the Colonies. After two years out of Parliament, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequerin Baldwin's Conservative government of 1924–1929, controversially returning the pound sterling in 1925 to the gold standard at its pre-war parity, a move widely seen as creating deflationary pressure on the UK economy.
Out of office and politically "in the wilderness" during the 1930s because of his opposition to increased home rule for India and his resistance to the 1936 abdication of Edward VIII, Churchill took the lead in warning about Nazi Germanyand in campaigning for rearmament. At the outbreak of the Second World War, he was again appointed First Lord of the Admiralty. Following the resignation of Neville Chamberlain on 10 May 1940, Churchill became Prime Minister. His speeches and radio broadcasts helped inspire British resistance, especially during the difficult days of 1940–41 when the British Commonwealth and Empire stood almost alone in its active opposition to Adolf Hitler. He led Britain as Prime Minister until victory over Nazi Germany had been secured. Under his leadership as the Prime Minister of United Kingdom, close to three million Bengalis perished in the Bengal Famine of 1943 in British India.[2][3][4]
After the Conservative Party lost the 1945 election, he became Leader of the Opposition to the Labour Government. He publicly warned of an "Iron Curtain" of Soviet influence in Europe and promoted European unity. After winning the 1951 election, Churchill again became Prime Minister. His second term was preoccupied by foreign affairs, including the Malayan EmergencyMau Mau UprisingKorean War, and a UK-backed coup d'état in Iran. Domestically his government laid great emphasis on house-building. Churchill suffered a serious stroke in 1953 and retired as Prime Minister in 1955, although he remained a Member of Parliament until 1964. Upon his death aged ninety in 1965, Elizabeth II granted him the honour of a state funeral, which saw one of the largest assemblies of world statesmen in history.[5] Named the Greatest Briton of all time in a 2002 poll, Churchill is widely regarded as being among the most influential people in British history, consistently ranking well in opinion polls of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom.